Two major news stories broke last week that should make anyone with a laptop, mobile phone or tablet take notice.

On Monday, the Wall Street Journal reported that U.S. companies use location sensors to track potential customers through their mobile phones without their knowledge and consent.

For example, Happy Child, an Asian restaurant in Toronto, tracked 636 customers as they ran errands, visited the doctor and went to the gym. Data revealed that 250 users visited a gym in one month alone, so the company developed a line of tank tops featuring their own logo.

“Instead of offering a general promotion that may or may not hit a nerve, we can promote specifically to the customer’s taste,” said Fan Zhang, the owner of Happy Child, according to the Wall Street Journal.  The Wall Street Journal also mentioned U.S. companies don’t have to get consent before collecting and sharing most personal information. This includes a user’s exact location.

On Tuesday, the New York Times and German media outlet N-TV announced that the National Security Agency (NSA) has installed software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world.  This allows the United States to conduct surveillance on those machines even though they are not connected to the internet. The possibility that a government agency has the ability to access remote personal data raises privacy concerns for individuals and companies alike.

RFID blocking technology provides way for users to stay safe and hack-free both on the go or at home. At Das Keyboard, we developed a hackshield messenger bag, backpack and wallet that uses RFID blocking material. It keeps user data safe anywhere by preventing electronics such as laptops, tablet and phones from being tracked or attacked wirelessly. It also stops them from communicating to the cloud without the users’ knowledge.

What concerns you most about marketers and the government gaining access to your private data? Share with us in the comments or tweet at us @daskeyboard.